Richest country in world forgetting 1 thing

During the Civil War, on March 30, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of humiliation, fasting and prayer: “Whereas, the Senate of the United States devoutly recognizing the Supreme Authority and just Government of Almighty God in all the affairs of men and of nations, has, by a resolution, requested the President to […] …

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What was John Tyler’s very 1st act as president?

“When a Christian people feel themselves to be overtaken by a great public calamity, it becomes them to humble themselves under the dispensation of Divine Providence. …” stated John Tyler in his first act as president, April 13, 1841. President John Tyler continued his proclamation of a national day of fasting and prayer: “… to […] …

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Different religions, vastly different outcomes

On April 16, 1859, French historian Alexis de Tocqueville died. After nine months of traveling the United States, he wrote “Democracy in America” in 1835, which has been described as “the most comprehensive … analysis of character and society in America ever written.” Alexis de Tocqueville wrote: “Upon my arrival in the United States the […] …

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Special highlights in African-American history

Who were the first African-American missionaries sent out from the United States? George Lisle, the first ordained African American, went in 1782 to Jamaica with other freed slaves to begin a Baptist Mission. John Marrant, a free black from New York City, went to Newfoundland and preached to “a great number of Indians and white […] …

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Historically, who enslaved and who freed slaves?

There has never been an abolitionist movement to completely end slavery in the Islamic world, as Mohammed himself owned slaves. The U.S. State Department in 1993 estimated 90,000 Southern Sudanese were captured and taken into slavery by North African Arabs. UNICEF estimated 200,000 children a year are sold from West and Central Africa to be […] …

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The speech that stunned listeners into silence

The Declaration of Independence indicted King George III because: “He has obstructed the administration of justice. …” “He has made judges dependent on his will alone. …” “He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people. …” “He has kept among us, in times of peace, […] …

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Ultimate tyrant’s goal: Nationalizing children

On March 22, 1758, Princeton University President Jonathan Edwards died from a smallpox inoculation. He had been the valedictorian of his class at Yale. He was ordained in 1727 as a minister in Northampton, Massachusetts, serving as assistant to his grandfather Solomon Stoddard. In 1727, Rev. Jonathan Edwards married Sarah Pierpont, whose father, Rev. James […] …

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