A Majority Of Americans Disagree With Donald Trump’s Hard-Line Stances On Climate Change

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Just this month, President Donald Trump issued an order to begin unraveling greenhouse gas regulations, flirted with exiting the Paris Agreement and proposed eliminating funding for climate change research.
But the White House’s hard-line stance against taking action to halt global warming appears to be out of step with most of the country, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov poll.
More than half of Americans, 57 percent, believe humans are causing climate change, compared with 24 percent who think the climate is changing but not because of human activity, and 5 percent who believe the climate isn’t changing at all.
Trump made slashing environmental rules the cornerstone of his plan to jump-start the U.S. economy. But opinions were mixed on how much regulation is necessary, with 28 percent arguing the current level of regulation is too low. Meanwhile, 26 percent said the level is about right, and 23 percent agreed with the president’s view that it’s too high.
A 55 percent majority of Americans support remaining in the Paris Agreement, the first global deal focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions that includes the U.S. and China. But 22 percent agreed with Trump advisers who say the U.S. should…

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Why We Lost Our Minds Over Leggings

This column originally appeared in Emily Peck’s newsletter, a weekly email that looks at the convergence of women, economics, business and politics. Sign up here. 

It’s a scandal with legs. Over the weekend, United Airlines kept two teenage girls off a plane because they were wearing leggings, which are apparently not appropriate pants for sitting inside a super-cramped cabin, with your knees in your throat, paying $8 for a sandwich and inhaling other people’s coughs and farts for many hours. The internet predictably went insane with outrage over the incident.
If you are a human American person, you probably know that millions of female persons in our soon-to-made-great-again country wear leggings ― especially young girls. Last year, online legging sales overtook jean sales. My daughter, who is 6, hasn’t worn jeans in years because obviously stretchy leggings are 1,000 times more comfortable and you can get them with glitter and butterflies. Many, many adult women also pointed out that United was continuing in an age-old tradition of shaming and sexualizing girls for wearing certain clothes.

We also shame grown-ass women

Yesterday Bill O’Reilly made fun of Rep. Maxine Waters. He later had to apologize. She said she didn’t care. Well, actually she said, “I’m a strong…

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Poll Finds Little Opposition To Confirming Neil Gorsuch

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A plurality of the public thinks the Senate should vote to confirm Neil Gorsuch as a Supreme Court justice, according to a newly released HuffPost/YouGov poll, although many say they’ve paid relatively little attention to the process.
Americans say by a 17-percentage-point margin, 40 percent to 23 percent, that Gorsuch, the federal appeals judge nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the seat left vacant by the death of Antonin Scalia, should be confirmed. An additional 37 percent aren’t sure. (A poll taken after Gorsuch’s nomination was first announced in February found that Americans favored confirmation by a similar 15-point margin, 43 percent to 28 percent, with 29 percent undecided.)
Progressive groups, buoyed by the failure last week of Republican efforts to repeal Obamacare, are hoping to gin up support for a Democratic filibuster against Gorsuch.
That resistance so far has largely failed to materialize. While health care tops the list of Americans’ biggest concerns, recent polling suggests, the Supreme Court currently lags near the bottom ― and while Hillary Clinton voters in the presidential election rallied strongly against the health care bill, which Trump voters supported only tepidly, the intensity gap seems to be reversed…

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Donald Trump’s Disastrous Plan To Derail U.S. Climate Action

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President Donald Trump signed a sweeping executive order on Tuesday aimed at reversing much of former President Barack Obama’s efforts to shrink the United States’ carbon footprint.
The long-awaited order instructs the Environmental Protection Agency to review the Clean Power Plan, the Obama administration’s signature policy for slashing greenhouse gas emissions from the utility sector, by far the country’s biggest emitter. This review marks the first step toward scrapping the regulation. 
“Perhaps no single regulation threatens our miners, energy workers and companies more than this crushing attack on American industry,” Trump said at the 2 p.m. signing at the EPA. “We’re ending the theft of American prosperity and rebuilding our beloved country.”
Trump’s order also directs the Department of the Interior to lift a temporary ban, put in place last year, on coal leasing on federal lands. In addition, it eliminates federal guidance instructing agencies to factor climate change into policymaking and disbands a team tasked with calculating the “social cost of carbon.” 
By undoing the Clean Power Plan, the Trump administration is putting projected carbon emissions back on an upward trajectory. It is also abandoning any hope of meeting the U.S. emissions reduction targets set out in…

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Barely Anyone Is Mourning The Demise Of The GOP’s Health Care Bill

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After Republicans’ attempt to repeal Obamacare failed, a narrow plurality of Americans wants to see the party move on to other issues, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov survey.
The American Health Care Act, which was deeply unpopular during its brief lifespan, is no more popular in its demise. Just 21 percent say they supported it, with a majority, 52 percent, saying they were opposed. The 6 percent who say they strongly favored the bill are outnumbered nearly 6 to 1 by those who strongly opposed it.
Americans say by a 7-percentage-point margin, 44 percent to 37 percent, that Republicans should move on to other issues rather than proposing another health care bill. Just under half think Donald Trump and Congress are still at least somewhat likely to repeal Obamacare, with 35 percent saying they’ll be disappointed if it remains standing.
Trump voters were only lukewarmly positive about AHCA ― 45 percent say that they supported it and 31 percent that they opposed it.  
But they generally don’t see its failure as a death knell for Republicans’ prospects of fulfilling their promise to repeal Obamacare. Most, 57 percent, want to see congressional Republicans propose a new health…

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Most Americans Say FBI Investigation Of Trump-Russia Ties Is Necessary

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The public largely believes that it’s worthwhile to investigate links between Russian government officials and associates of President Donald Trump, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov poll.
Americans say by a 17-point margin, 48 percent to 31 percent, that the Trump administration’s relationship with Russia is a legitimate issue.
Forty-seven percent consider it a very serious problem, although just under one-third say it’s very serious. Thirty-seven percent say it’s not very serious or not a problem at all, with another 16 percent saying they aren’t sure.
When pressed, people who say they’re unsure about the issue generally support an investigation. With no “undecided” option given, Americans say by a 28-point margin, 64 percent to 36 percent, that the FBI’s investigation into possible ties between Trump’s associates and Russian government officials is necessary.
About half of the public believes that Russia interfered in the 2016 election, although just 35 percent believe the interference was intended to help elect Trump. Twenty-three percent don’t believe Russia interfered, with another 28 percent unsure.
During last week’s congressional intelligence hearings, House Republicans focused their questions largely on leaks to the media, while Democrats expressed more interest in Russia’s role in last year’s campaign. Americans are…

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